I feed you

She grew up poor, when counted in cash.

She grew up hungry, when counted in meals.

Flowers she grew and food she served.

When there was no money, it was food.

When there was no food, it was flowers.

She never knew the saying but lived it –

Bread for the body, flowers for the soul.

 

She taught me to knead the dough, with love.

She let me bite the perogies closed, with a wink.

Flowers ruled her garden, weeds wouldn’t dare!

When there weren’t words, she would cook.

When she wasn’t cooking, we were eating.

Good food was the best gift she ever gave.

She never knew, didn’t get to see her in me.

Bread for the body, flowers for the soul.

 

I teach him to knead the dough, remembering her.

I teach him to roll the cookies, to taste the soup.

We watch it rise, we watch it bubble and we smile.

He never knew her, not face to face, but through me.

Great grandma whose only gift is the gift that lives on.

Her words, “I feed you” was more than bread for the body,

They are the memories that feed our souls.

Miss you Grandma!

Our baking endeavors last week included snail bread, buns, stuffed crust pizza dough and caramel apple bread.

Posting with Real Toads for a very yummy Wednesday challenge…stop by won’t you? http://withrealtoads.blogspot.ca

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32 Comments

  1. ella said,

    May 23, 2012 at 6:11 pm

    I love this, you feed my soul reading it! I love the cherished thoughts that surface when baking and remembering our loved ones~
    This was such a lovely tribute to her memory! Beautiful…

    • shanyns said,

      May 23, 2012 at 6:55 pm

      Ella – thank you! πŸ™‚ I miss her sometimes so very much, and baking is one of those times! Glad you enjoyed it.

  2. May 23, 2012 at 6:16 pm

    Those of us blessed with a wondrous grandmother relationship are doubly lucky when we get to assume the opposite role and play it again.

    • shanyns said,

      May 23, 2012 at 6:56 pm

      Kim – thank you! You are so right, it is great to play that role in reverse. Glad you enjoyed the poem.

  3. May 23, 2012 at 6:26 pm

    This is a precious memory you have recorded. So important to pass these traditions on to the next generation.

    • shanyns said,

      May 23, 2012 at 6:57 pm

      Kerry – thank you! I agree, we need to pass on the traditions, we need them! So pleased you enjoyed the poem.

  4. May 23, 2012 at 7:19 pm

    I love this poem– it’s fabulous! you need to change wasn’t flowers to weren’t… minor– but I love the directness of this and your playing off of food and flowers. A great tribute because it doesn’t descend into being corny– shows concentrated effort, Shanyn! xj

    • shanyns said,

      May 23, 2012 at 7:22 pm

      Thanks for pointing that out Jenne, I’ll risk the wrath of WordPress to correct it…and I’m so glad you enjoyed the read, it is GREAT to see you here!

  5. May 23, 2012 at 7:19 pm

    sorry– “weren’t words” xxxj

  6. Teresa said,

    May 23, 2012 at 7:54 pm

    How wonderful! I love that family lives on with such traditions.

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 5:09 pm

      Teresa – thanks for coming by, and yes those traditions are so important aren’t they?

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:06 pm

      Teresa – thanks! I love having traditions to share.

  7. ManicDdaily said,

    May 23, 2012 at 9:53 pm

    Lovely. My grandmother was like that. K.

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 5:09 pm

      That is cool your grandma was like that too! πŸ™‚

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:06 pm

      So cool to know there were a few people who had a grandma like this! πŸ™‚ Glad you enjoyed it!

  8. Karen said,

    May 23, 2012 at 11:00 pm

    Memories of those who have fed our body and soul, live on forever!

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:07 pm

      Karen – it is so true! Food brings back such powerful memories for us, both good and bad, and they can feed generations!

  9. May 24, 2012 at 1:44 am

    Okay…good job, Shanyns!! You got the water-works going here!! I’m so lucky my kids get to meet my Grammy. Your Gram sounds SO precious and this is SUCH an amazing tribute to her. Thank you for writing this. πŸ™‚

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:09 pm

      Hannah – here is a tissue! So happy for your children to have those memories. I wish he could have known his Great Grandma (mine) but I know they’ll cook up a storm in heaven someday! Thanks for the sweet comment and, as always, for coming by.

      • May 25, 2012 at 4:17 am

        So true, Shanyn!! Thank you for the reminder and the tissue!! πŸ™‚

  10. May 24, 2012 at 2:41 am

    Oh good for you, teaching your son to love to cook. What a glorious repast you have shown us here. You made me remember my grandma – when the relatives visited, we all said “the frying pan never cooled down”….pancakes with brown sugar, strawberry shortcake, served to the men in serving bowls rather than polite little dessert bowls (that’s where I get it from!) Sigh. Lovely poem, lovely memories, and they brought up some of my own. Grandmas rock!

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:11 pm

      Sherry – we do love to cook and bake together. I loved your poem, especially the memory of the frying pan never getting a chance to cool down! Amazing sounding food you described. So glad you enjoyed the poem.

  11. May 24, 2012 at 2:19 pm

    I love this, Shanyn, all of it. One of my grandmothers never got to meet her great-grandchildren, but the other knew them, and they knew her. And she loved to cook, and to feed people. I still miss both of them, but your poem brought many memories to light today.
    K

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:12 pm

      Kay – thank you! So glad you enjoyed it. Luke knew two of his Great Grandma’s and it is a very special memory to him. I miss my Grandma but her food always brings back the good memories!

  12. May 24, 2012 at 2:19 pm

    PS
    All sons should learn to cook.

  13. brian miller said,

    May 24, 2012 at 3:56 pm

    this is so touching…you made my eyes misty…at my own memories that fell in a bit with yorus of those kitchen moments wiht my own mom…smiles….

    • shanyns said,

      May 24, 2012 at 8:15 pm

      Brian – glad I gave you some smiles and some misty eyes too…loves those memories! Thanks for coming by my friend.

  14. vivinfrance said,

    May 25, 2012 at 12:36 pm

    Lovely, lovely tribute to a Grandma. I hope my family feels the same way about me. Please could you blog a recipe for that caramel apple bread? I could do with some of that – well perhaps not right away, as I’ve just eaten a mighty doorstep from the not-quite-cool bread on my kitchen table!

    • shanyns said,

      May 25, 2012 at 3:14 pm

      I’m sure your family feels that way…if you aren’t sure, tell them one day is for sharing and making memories, see what they want to do! You might be surprised πŸ™‚ The apple bread is very easy – make your usual bread dough (I love the Texas Road House Rolls Copycat recipe), then take about 1/3. press it flat in a cookie sheet, press sliced apples into the top of the dough, sprinkle with sugar, brown sugar and cinnamon. Drizzle caramel sauce over top, bake at 350 until golden brown. Yummy! Thanks for coming by..

  15. May 26, 2012 at 8:21 pm

    I love this…what sweet memories you have of your grandmother and you are passing them on…I must say my cooking skills are minimal…I am so jealous!!

    http://confessionsofalaundrygoddess.blogspot.com/2012/05/twisted-temptation.html

    • shanyns said,

      May 27, 2012 at 6:38 pm

      Susie – thanks…! I love cooking and being cooked for. Wish you could come by and we could visit in the kitchen!


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