Lost Lilacs

 

Frost warnings – almost every week.

Cover the plants, save them.

Can’t save them all though.

No lilacs this year – damn frost.

 

Cover the plants, save them.

Flowers and veggies, herbs too.

Dead butterflies on the grass.

 

Can’t save them all though.

Butterflies, bees and snakes.

Sad corpses, brightly hued.

 

No lilacs this year – damn frost.

Some years it is a purple hedge.

This year richly and sadly green.

 

For dVerse, an attempt at using a form but still appearing to have used free verse.  My form? Trimeric.  My attempt?  That’s your call!

Trimeric \tri-(meh)-rik\ n: a four stanza poem in which the first stanza has four lines and the last three stanzas have three lines each, with the first line of each repeating the respective line of the first stanza.  The sequence of lines, then, isabcd, b – -, c – -, d – -.

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14 Comments

  1. June 1, 2012 at 4:47 pm

    We seldom have to deal with this problem whare we live; unless we try to plant in January. Sometimes we’ll get an early spring (January) and things will bud and get frost bit by a cold spell, but thnever hard enough to stop them from coming back when spring does arrive.
    I enjoyed your poem!
    http://charleslmashburn.wordpress.com/2012/05/31/dreams-like-that/

    • shanyns said,

      June 1, 2012 at 4:50 pm

      Charles – thanks for coming by. Planting in January, unless you are indoors, is only good if you grow icicles here! 🙂

  2. brian miller said,

    June 1, 2012 at 8:04 pm

    i remember when we were in florida you had to always cover the fruit trees…this year i imagine was interesting for many with the false winter we had and such an early spring but still some frost….nice form too…will have to learn that one…

    • shanyns said,

      June 2, 2012 at 2:25 am

      Brian – I’ve heard of that and of using fans or misting sprays to save the fruit…we use blankets, towels and shirts! 🙂 Thanks for coming by, I like that form I may have to play with it some more.

    • shanyns said,

      June 2, 2012 at 2:29 am

      Brian – I have heard of that as well as fans and misting set-ups for the fruit trees. We rednecks just use blankets, towels and shirts! Thanks for coming by, I think I’ll play with that form again.

  3. markwindham said,

    June 1, 2012 at 8:07 pm

    In Atlanta, we enjoy a good late frost. Cuts down on the bug/mosquito/creepy-crawling-critter population. 🙂

    Well done on the poem.

    • shanyns said,

      June 2, 2012 at 2:30 am

      Mark – thanks! I keep hoping the frost did something bad to the ‘skeeters but those tough little bags probably made it through! Glad you enjoyed the poem.

  4. June 1, 2012 at 10:57 pm

    I like what you did with the form ~ Too bad about the frost ~ We are going to have a wet and cloudy weekend 😦

    • shanyns said,

      June 2, 2012 at 2:30 am

      Thanks, glad you enjoyed the poem. We could have storms tonight but should have a nice weekend ahead! yay no more frost (I hope!)

  5. Bodhirose said,

    June 2, 2012 at 2:37 am

    I sure can relate to this..some winters we have to haul as much as we can indoors or cover large plants when a frost comes..and then the temps go right back up to 75 degrees again…that’s Florida for you! Enjoyed your poem, Shanyn!

    • shanyns said,

      June 2, 2012 at 2:57 pm

      Florida sounds like it has it’s own challenges with weather too! Thanks for stopping by, so glad you enjoyed the poem.

  6. ManicDdaily said,

    June 2, 2012 at 3:13 am

    Is that what happened? I have been going back and forth to country and thought I just missed the lilacs! Agh! I hate it especially when the apples are ruined. Your poem has this brusque New Englander quality- sturdy and feisty. K>

    • shanyns said,

      June 2, 2012 at 3:26 pm

      Yep that’s what happened! Sad isn’t it? You didn’t miss them, they didn’t happen for many of us. I think we won’t have much for tree fruit this year. Thanks for your comment about the poem. I was trying for that within the form. Thanks for stopping by.


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